Blake Psychotherapy & Associates
(410) 988-4002     scannon@blakepsychotherapy.com


Sharon Cannon, PhD

Psychologist

Hi, there. I’m Sharon Cannon, and I’m a psychologist, born, raised, and trained in the Midwest, and a transplant to the East Coast for the last 4 years.  I think my Midwestern upbringing and education emphasized the values of humility, hard work, and the unique potential we all have to contribute and connect to the world around us, as well as the importance of a sense humor in the face of life’s absurdities.  I am consistently fascinated and impressed by people’s abilities to survive challenges and hardships, but realize how much more efficient this process can be when they use the resources available to them, including support and guidance. I have worked as a licensed psychologist for almost 23 years now, providing this guidance and helping clients establish the resources that will support them on their life path beyond our counseling relationship.

 

I grew up in a suburb of Chicago, and got my undergraduate degree in psychology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.  I then moved to Nebraska (yes, Nebraska!) and received my Master’s and Doctorate at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln.  My area of focus was adolescence and young adulthood, reflecting my fascination with identity, establishment of personal roles, and navigation of life transitions—issues I came to realize are relevant to all of us regardless our age.  Working with these issues also naturally led itself to further training and experience with eating disordered populations. Increasingly, I find myself also drawn to the identity and transitional issues of middle-adulthood, a time period in which we’re seeing more eating disorder problems, as well as depressive and anxiety responses.

 My approach to working with clients is very much dependent on what they bring in to the therapy context, in terms of problems, goals, developmental stage, and interpersonal style.  Universally, I tend to be rather active and directive—not big into simply nodding, uh-huhing, and reflecting back what you’ve already said.  My goals are to provide support, but also to help you understand and accept yourself--to enable you to recognize, predict, and work with your own patterns, as we are all creatures of habit.  The end result is an ability to see and accept one’s own strengths and weaknesses, to find productive ways to meet one’s own needs, and then to establish a lifestyle that taps into the qualities and abilities one most values.  I feel honored to be part of this process with people who start psychotherapy with me.